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April 28, 2013

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In German, Schmuck is a noun meaning jewelry. The Yiddish is more complicated, but is discussed on Wikipedia.

Was just fighting with the autofocus on my camera this morning. A timely post.


A very timely post indeed, Gordon. It's as if you are writing my story.

I put my D7000, lenses and flash up for sale a few days before you posted this blog. My reason? Oh, there are several - the biggest of which is to use smaller, lighter gear - but the tipping point came after a recent shoot when too many images were out of focus. I finished the shoot with my nephew's D5100 and it worked flawlessly with my own lenses. I've experienced this problem at least a dozen times and neither Nikon's repair shop nor fine focus tweaking have been able to solve it.

It was after this latest incident that I decided to sell the D7000, which led me to think about what I shoot most often, which in turn led me to rethink my entire system.

I've narrowed down my choices but I still haven't decided which system or format to use. I know it'll be small - in physical size and in quantity - and the controls and knobs will favour manual exposure. I'll limit myself to two lenses and one flash, and most importantly, I'll buy a new tripod. A small one that I'll actually carry around and use.

I'm looking forward to hearing about your decision and the process you went through to get there. All the best with it. And keep shooting and writing: your images are superb and your thoughts and perspective are always welcome.

Dan

The present day cameras do not give us a good, reliable way to manually focus a camera. Most of them (SLRs) have mirrors instead of prisms. The view is dim at best and there is no way one can accurately judge the focus.
More over the image in the view finder is much smaller than the "old" film cameras.
The cameras in the market with prisms (and the one with rangefinder) are far too big for comfort and far too expensive.
So there is no way we can hope to do a decent manual focusing. Who is to blame? Not that we are not willing to do manual focusing.

>>The present day cameras do not give us a good, reliable way to manually focus a camera.

What about Live View? It's not great for moving subjects but it can be quite effective and accurate if your camera is tripod-mounted.

Gordon

Nice abstract of the Zurich airport.

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Thank you!

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